#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Finding the invisible marginalisations?

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What makes me marginalized is invisible. For the most part. That makes it easier for me to “blend” into what people consider to be the norm and be “accepted” by my peers. At least, it would if I wasn’t vocal about what makes me different. But these different types of marginalizations make me realize how little intersectionality there was in publishing as I was growing up, how much it has grown, and what we can hope for in the future. Continue reading

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#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Biculturalism in YA books – Middle Eastern Indian

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Hey! My name is Fariha, when I first heard about Fadwa hosting #DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss I quickly jumped to the opportunity. While I had initially thought of the topic revolving around how much there is a lack of biculturalism in literature. I quickly narrowed it down to what I know best: Identifying as a Middle Eastern Indian and my (our) representation in young adult books. While the term may be misleading, I’m ethnically Indian and I’m also the second generation to be born and raised in Saudi Arabia.   Continue reading