#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss : The Rise of Diversity + Book recommendations

Krisha

Hi Guys! Today , for the first time ever, I am writing a discussion post about a topic I feel strongly about: The rise of diversity in books and the recognition of diverse authors and books and the positive impact it has brought about.

Since last year, I have seen more and more people picking up books by minority authors and giving them the same love and recognition (rightfully deserves) which they would give to a non-POC author. I am Indian and I myself admittedly did not always read a lot of diverse books. I feel bad about it now because being a POC, I should’ve been more aware of such books. I always read the most popular books and hence neglected other lesser known books. But better late than never, I have realized my mistake and hence I am consciously trying to bring a change and support more diverse authors.

This recent surge of diverse books and the appreciation that they’re getting is the happiest thing for me. Usually, we always read a lot about Greek Mythology but not a lot of books with Hindu mythology or Chinese mythology or Malaysian history got a lot of attention. This is not because of the lack of such books but the lack of recognition for them.

When I first read ‘When Dimple Met Rishi’ by Sandhya Menon I was elated. The protagonist being of Indian descent and the stories, the people and the food made me feel so connected to it. That is when I understood how beautiful diverse books can be in being able to connect the reader to their roots. Since then I have tried and read a lot of such books such as : The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi, An Ember in Ashes series by Sabaa Tahir, Love, Hate and other filters by Samira Ahmed, The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X.R. Pan. I have many beautiful books on my TBR which I yet have to read which I know are going to super fun and amazing.

One of the biggest advantages of this rise is the appreciation the authors get. Historically, POC have always had it difficult but to be able to see people enjoying their book and learning about the culture and heritage is just amazing. This gives a lot more encouragement to many readers and authors to bring forward their stories. It is also a beautiful feeling as a reader to be able to read about your culture, heritage, people and food especially from a person who understands and appreciates it.

It helps to fight the stereotypes that are surrounding various diverse communities as well and helps everyone to be more sensitive and aware of the different cultures and communities. This is why I urge you all to support more diverse books and authors and shower them with the love and hype they deserve!

You can also participate in the Year of the Asian reading challenge hosted by Shealea, Lily, CW and Vicky in which we are reading books by Asian authors and supporting them. I love this challenge because I can read more Asian books and also support more of South Asian books. There are many book clubs you can join to read more diverse books like: Latinx Book Club, Stars and Sorcery Book Club which reads SFF written by authors of colour, Diverse Divers Book Club.

Thanks to the YARC 2019, I have read some great books recently which are: Jade City by Fonda Lee, Girls of Paper and Fire by Natasha Ngan, The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi, There’s Something about Sweetie by Sandhya Menon, The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang.

Although there have been significant progress, we still have a long way to go as even now there are a lot of such communities and identities which are not yet represented and which do not get the same recognition. I hope we get to see a lot of changes and love for diverse authors and books all over.

I have some great diverse books on my TBR which you’ll can check out as well:


krisha-sig.pngBook Blogger @ Bookathon Blog

Krisha is an Indian blogger who loves to talk about books and everything related. A lover of diverse books and flowers 🌹🌸

Notable Posts:

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss is a way to boost diverse bloggers who are brilliant, have a lot to say and deserve to be heard loud and clear. What this is, is basically a guest post feature where every Sunday, one blogger from a minority will discuss things they are passionate about on my blog. 

 

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