#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Embracing my Nigerian Identity

Taiwo
My name is Taiwo and I’m a Nigerian book and lifestyle blogger. When Fadwa mentioned that she was resuming #DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss, I was so excited to participate! I’m a very private person and I never write discussion posts but I am really happy to be included in this one because I need to write about this; not just for other people but mainly for me, and the young girl who grew up to shun her heritage.

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#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Inclusivity – Booktube vs. Book Blogging

Kala

I haven’t been in the bookish community for very long, in April it will actually be a year. The decision to be a book reviewer was it a quick one, but what platform to use; that was a harder decision. Book blogging or booktube? Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Busting some Indian myths & stereotypes

Prags

Hey guys! My name is Prags and I have been blogging for about 3 years now, on and off. My time in the community, and western media, has taught me that there are certain preconceived notions, myths, and stereotypes surrounding people of South Asian descent and I thought it would be a good time to share the truth about some of them! I want you to keep in mind that though these are general South Asian stereotypes, I can only speak from an Indian perspective since I am an Indian and I am not versed with the lifestyle of people living in other South Asian countries, even though all of us do have many things in common. So, from here on, I shall be using the term Indian as compared to South Asian. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: The Fantasy of Historical Romance

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Historical Romance is a fantasy. It’s one that we as readers choose to engage in again and again for pleasure. It promises us the one thing that is promised in all genre romance: a happily ever after. However, the question that we need to ask ourselves as readers is: who is able to get their happily ever after? The answer to that question is closely connected to another: whose stories are being told in Historical Romance? Unpacking those questions requires looking critically at the books that are being published. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Pansexuality in Literature

 

Alexis

My name is Alexis and I’m a pansexual booktuber who goes by The Sloth Reader. When Fadwa called for people to make guest posts regarding their specific marginalizations, I knew exactly what I wanted to write about. I’m constantly in awe by the wonderful queer content being produced lately, but I’ve yet to find more than a few books that feature a character that is pansexual. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: US Bloggers’ privilege and whatnots

Angela

When I decided to create my blog, I knew I had to spend a lot of my time and effort into creating good and interesting content. But I took the step anyway because I love books too much and I enjoy talking about them and recommending the ones I liked.
But there are many factors that go into your blog’s success and one of them is where you are based. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: A Brown girl thinking about Books

 

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Look at the sky and scrunch up your eyes.

Now, what do you see?

You know what I see? I see myriad skies at once – orange sprouting grey tufts, blue gilded gold, a sombre red grouching very noticeably. I sense words trickle through my mind – a brazen shower of emotions and thoughts.

I see the skies I’ve read. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Exclusivity and #Bookstagram

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When I first joined the online book community in the middle of last year it was an exciting time. Having been a lifelong reader it was amazing to have this space where I could connect with other readers and enthuse over my favourite books with others.

It’s still that amazing space but there are elements that I hadn’t considered then, that are apparent now. There is a lot of work that goes into blogging, not just the time it takes to read but the act of reviewing, cross posting reviews and maintaining one or more social media accounts. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Where are all the British Pakistani authors in YA?

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There are a variety of reasons for the lack of the representation of British Pakistani young adults in literature as well as the lack of British Pakistani authors, but the prime reason is perhaps the fact of how the publishing industry is perceived. That’s not to say that there aren’t many other marginalised groups such as British Bangladeshi, British Indian and British Chinese…to name just a few, there’s a whole long list, but because of my own experiences I’ve decided to focus on British Pakistani. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Arabs & Muslims in YA Literature

 

Angel.png

As a child, I read a lot. A lot a lot.

I guess it had something to do with the fact that I’m the eldest of my siblings, and I wasn’t very good at making friends.

Back then, I didn’t have much of a preference. I just read whatever I could get my hands on in the school library—books about fairies, a girl’s misadventures in high school, mythological fantasy, even (mild) horror. They were all very different and I liked them very much.

Except that they all had one thing in common: white. White. White. Continue reading