#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Why representation matters to me

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There’s nothing like the feeling of reading a book that you simply just can’t put down. The thrill, adrenaline, and captivation are some of the major ingredients of what makes a book so difficult to put down; but one major aspect that is gradually making more of a prominent presence in the book and writing community is diverse representation. Below I’ve listed the books that I am personally so thankful that exist because I felt represented in them!
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#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Bridging the Gap – A Letter to 15-Year-Old Me on Adoption

Sara

Hello readers! 

Many thanks, first off, to Fadwa for hosting this amazing series! If you don’t know me, I’m Sara, and I blog over at Lyrical Reads, bookstagram over at @lyrical.reads, and occasionally tweet over at @lyricalreads. I’m so grateful that I get to be a part of #DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss!

When I first showed interest in participating in the #DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss series, I had a very vague idea of what I wanted to write about. I definitely knew that I wanted to write about something on international adoption (particularly Chinese adoption) because I was adopted when I was 11-months-old. However, I needed an angle, and I needed books I could talk about. Fortunately, I found the books (not that many, though), one which I just finished a few days ago, and the angle found its way to me not too long afterwards.  Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Finding the invisible marginalisations?

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What makes me marginalized is invisible. For the most part. That makes it easier for me to “blend” into what people consider to be the norm and be “accepted” by my peers. At least, it would if I wasn’t vocal about what makes me different. But these different types of marginalizations make me realize how little intersectionality there was in publishing as I was growing up, how much it has grown, and what we can hope for in the future. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Biculturalism in YA books – Middle Eastern Indian

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Hey! My name is Fariha, when I first heard about Fadwa hosting #DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss I quickly jumped to the opportunity. While I had initially thought of the topic revolving around how much there is a lack of biculturalism in literature. I quickly narrowed it down to what I know best: Identifying as a Middle Eastern Indian and my (our) representation in young adult books. While the term may be misleading, I’m ethnically Indian and I’m also the second generation to be born and raised in Saudi Arabia.   Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Growing up without diverse books

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This may come as a shock to those who know me now, but when I was little, I despised reading. When I first learned to read, I rarely applied my new skill to anything outside of the classroom.  I did not read for entertainment, and I was primarily drawn to picture books. I thought, “What’s the point? It’s all boring and it takes too much time!”  Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Being a Bookworm in Portugal

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Hi, bookworm friends! My name is Marta and I usually rant about my opinions on books and bookish subjects on my blog, the book mermaid. Today I changed it up a bit, but I’m here to share with you how my reading habits are seen in my country, Portugal, that is indeed quite small(ish) – especially compared to the US. 😞 Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Writing a Biracial Identity

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Writing a book is difficult. Try adding in pieces of yourself and the process gets even more complicated.

            I’ve wanted to include a piece of myself in every story. Up until I tackled my first book, it was usually depression or anxiety rep. These were two things I had become so intimately tied to that putting them on the page seemed natural. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: The “Hidden Gems”: Why are F/F romances so hard to find?

Nadia

Representation of the LGBTQ+ community in YA has come a long way since the dark ages. Or since the 2000s, when all we got was J. K. Rowling’s retconning of Dumbledore’s character and a couple of David Levithan’s books hidden away in the teen fiction section of the book store. But sometimes it feels like even when we’re making strides towards better representation of queer individuals, a large part of the community is being left out. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Jewish Book Recommendations

Hannah

For the first seventeen years of my life, the only Jewish rep in books I ever saw were Holocaust books. While I do appreciate the value of such books and I do think it’s an important subject that needs to be written about, it got really frustrating to see the same narrative over and over again. As I am half-Jewish and identify as a cultural Jew,  it’s frustrating to see such a complex identity be reduced to simple terms.

When I finally found books that featured Jewish rep and weren’t Holocaust fiction, it was like a breath of fresh air. I still haven’t read that many but with everyone I read, I feel a catharsis that I didn’t even know I needed. So without further ado, here are some books with Jewish rep that I loved and books with Jewish rep that I can’t wait to read. Continue reading