#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Writing a Biracial Identity

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Writing a book is difficult. Try adding in pieces of yourself and the process gets even more complicated.

            I’ve wanted to include a piece of myself in every story. Up until I tackled my first book, it was usually depression or anxiety rep. These were two things I had become so intimately tied to that putting them on the page seemed natural. Continue reading

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#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss : The Rise of Diversity + Book recommendations

Krisha

Hi Guys! Today , for the first time ever, I am writing a discussion post about a topic I feel strongly about: The rise of diversity in books and the recognition of diverse authors and books and the positive impact it has brought about.

Since last year, I have seen more and more people picking up books by minority authors and giving them the same love and recognition (rightfully deserves) which they would give to a non-POC author. I am Indian and I myself admittedly did not always read a lot of diverse books. I feel bad about it now because being a POC, I should’ve been more aware of such books. I always read the most popular books and hence neglected other lesser known books. But better late than never, I have realized my mistake and hence I am consciously trying to bring a change and support more diverse authors.

This recent surge of diverse books and the appreciation that they’re getting is the happiest thing for me. Usually, we always read a lot about Greek Mythology but not a lot of books with Hindu mythology or Chinese mythology or Malaysian history got a lot of attention. This is not because of the lack of such books but the lack of recognition for them.

When I first read ‘When Dimple Met Rishi’ by Sandhya Menon I was elated. The protagonist being of Indian descent and the stories, the people and the food made me feel so connected to it. That is when I understood how beautiful diverse books can be in being able to connect the reader to their roots. Since then I have tried and read a lot of such books such as : The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi, An Ember in Ashes series by Sabaa Tahir, Love, Hate and other filters by Samira Ahmed, The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X.R. Pan. I have many beautiful books on my TBR which I yet have to read which I know are going to super fun and amazing.

One of the biggest advantages of this rise is the appreciation the authors get. Historically, POC have always had it difficult but to be able to see people enjoying their book and learning about the culture and heritage is just amazing. This gives a lot more encouragement to many readers and authors to bring forward their stories. It is also a beautiful feeling as a reader to be able to read about your culture, heritage, people and food especially from a person who understands and appreciates it.

It helps to fight the stereotypes that are surrounding various diverse communities as well and helps everyone to be more sensitive and aware of the different cultures and communities. This is why I urge you all to support more diverse books and authors and shower them with the love and hype they deserve!

You can also participate in the Year of the Asian reading challenge hosted by Shealea, Lily, CW and Vicky in which we are reading books by Asian authors and supporting them. I love this challenge because I can read more Asian books and also support more of South Asian books. There are many book clubs you can join to read more diverse books like: Latinx Book Club, Stars and Sorcery Book Club which reads SFF written by authors of colour, Diverse Divers Book Club.

Thanks to the YARC 2019, I have read some great books recently which are: Jade City by Fonda Lee, Girls of Paper and Fire by Natasha Ngan, The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi, There’s Something about Sweetie by Sandhya Menon, The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang.

Although there have been significant progress, we still have a long way to go as even now there are a lot of such communities and identities which are not yet represented and which do not get the same recognition. I hope we get to see a lot of changes and love for diverse authors and books all over.

I have some great diverse books on my TBR which you’ll can check out as well:


krisha-sig.pngBook Blogger @ Bookathon Blog

Krisha is an Indian blogger who loves to talk about books and everything related. A lover of diverse books and flowers 🌹🌸

Notable Posts:

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss is a way to boost diverse bloggers who are brilliant, have a lot to say and deserve to be heard loud and clear. What this is, is basically a guest post feature where every Sunday, one blogger from a minority will discuss things they are passionate about on my blog. 

 

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Where are all the British Pakistani authors in YA?

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There are a variety of reasons for the lack of the representation of British Pakistani young adults in literature as well as the lack of British Pakistani authors, but the prime reason is perhaps the fact of how the publishing industry is perceived. That’s not to say that there aren’t many other marginalised groups such as British Bangladeshi, British Indian and British Chinese…to name just a few, there’s a whole long list, but because of my own experiences I’ve decided to focus on British Pakistani. Continue reading

Word Wonder’s TBR Expansion: MENAH Month Recommendations

Menah Month

Hello friends!

I know I haven’t really been keeping up with blogging the past month and I’m really sorry about that! But I’ll get more into that in my August wrap-up, for now, I am back with a list that’s near and dear to my heart. In case you didn’t know (how?) I’m North African, Moroccan to be more specific. So, in celebration of August being Middle Eastern North African Heritage Month (which, most of the world isn’t aware of) I decided I would make books with North African and Middle Eastern  main characters the focus of my recommendations post. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Why Asexual representation is Important

 

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For most of my life, I’ve been a reader. I’ve read just about everything—science fiction, fantasy, contemporary, etc. No matter which genre, there was always romance. Even if it wasn’t the focus of the story, love was never too far. Every novel described what it felt like to fall in love: the pounding of a heartbeat, desire for touch and affection, and the devastation of a heartache. While I never failed to absorb the feelings written, I’d never truly related to that heart-stopping rush of emotions these authors described so vividly. Continue reading

WORD WONDERS’ TBR EXPANSION : Books with South Asian Main Characters

 

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Hello friends!

It’s been a while since I’ve done a recommendations post, with my hiatus and only being here for half June, I didn’t get around to putting one together last month and I also didn’t have a time slot for it. But now here we are. I’ve been wanting to do Asian book recommendations for a while but since there are so many beautiful identities under the umbrella term, I decided that to make easier for me as well as for people who are looking for recommendations, I’ll split it up in regions so for today’s post, it’s books with South Asian main characters.

I will try to include content warnings for as many of them. The ones that I couldn’t find content warnings for will have a (*) in front of their titles. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: The cultural challenge of International Book Blogging

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I once blogged in Portuguese. That’s my language, the one I was raised speaking. I was part of the Brazilian book blogging community, and it was great in some ways, lousy in others. Once I decided to come back to blogging, I made the option to join the international book blogging community. To blog in English this time around. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: I am not Invisible – An Indian American experience

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Hello Hello! I’m still on hiatus but this is an important blog post for AAPI month. I also wanted to mention that this post is a little different since Kav is a Booktuber and not a Book blogger but I still wanted to have them on my blog because they’re awesome.

When you hear the word ‘Asia,’ what do you think of? Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Unknown Identities Should be Normalized – and Not Ostracized

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Before I start this post, I want to make something clear: this was very hard for me to write. It’s a personal issue I have, and something I care about immensely, but also something that no one else seems to be concerned or aware about (or, at least, no one I follow talks about). This post is coming from an #OwnVoices perspective, but maybe #OwnVoices doesn’t precisely apply here. Does it? Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Representations in books and medias, or the one thing I’m craving

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When Fadwa asked me a few months ago if I wanted to be part of this amazing project she had created — #DIVERSEBOOKBLOGGERSDISCUSS — I freaked out. At first I was scared I wouldn’t be able to write something I’m proud of or something that Fadwa would like reading (Fadwa: I really really love this post, so no complaints on my end), this was really what I was the most scared of. Then I was scared people would think I’m not legitimate enough to talk about the subject I’m discussing in today’s post, but my best friend reminded me that my voice matters. So here I am. Continue reading