MUSLIM VOICES RISE UP – What drives me to write

2- What Drives me to write

Salaams friends!

Welcome to Muslim Voices Rise Up, a month-long project taking place during Ramadan where Muslim authors and bloggers share their experiences on various topics. This project is dedicated to centering Muslim experiences and showcasing the diversity within our own narratives. You can find more info, along with other blog posts for this project, on the introduction post. In today’s post, Muslim writers share what drives them to write, what started their passion and what keeps them going. It’s all really inspiring, if you ask me. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Our Generational Acquiescence of the White Fantasy

Shri

If you know me at all, you’ve probably been on the receiving end of rants regarding today’s utter monotony, particularly in a racial sense, of the fantasy genre. And if you don’t know me, you’re about to experience the customary spiel. However, as much as I can go on and on critiquing the state of the fantasy genre today and its continuous lack of normalized diversity, I’d like to dig a little deeper and explore why exactly the lack of diversity is so much more evident and so much harder to climb out of when it comes to fantasy in the present day. I believe that if we can pinpoint the underlying roots of the issue, it will become easier to question and subvert a lot of the elements of fantasy we have simply accepted as truth. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: A Brown girl thinking about Books

 

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Look at the sky and scrunch up your eyes.

Now, what do you see?

You know what I see? I see myriad skies at once – orange sprouting grey tufts, blue gilded gold, a sombre red grouching very noticeably. I sense words trickle through my mind – a brazen shower of emotions and thoughts.

I see the skies I’ve read. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Where are all the British Pakistani authors in YA?

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There are a variety of reasons for the lack of the representation of British Pakistani young adults in literature as well as the lack of British Pakistani authors, but the prime reason is perhaps the fact of how the publishing industry is perceived. That’s not to say that there aren’t many other marginalised groups such as British Bangladeshi, British Indian and British Chinese…to name just a few, there’s a whole long list, but because of my own experiences I’ve decided to focus on British Pakistani. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Arabs & Muslims in YA Literature

 

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As a child, I read a lot. A lot a lot.

I guess it had something to do with the fact that I’m the eldest of my siblings, and I wasn’t very good at making friends.

Back then, I didn’t have much of a preference. I just read whatever I could get my hands on in the school library—books about fairies, a girl’s misadventures in high school, mythological fantasy, even (mild) horror. They were all very different and I liked them very much.

Except that they all had one thing in common: white. White. White. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Representation Matters – An African Perspective

Etinosa

 

The need for people to see themselves represented in books, movies, real life has been talked about so much that some people might be tired of hearing it. But let me tell you about my own personal experience. Continue reading

#DiverseBookBloggersDiscuss: Writing your Trauma – Writing and PTSD

 
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TW: Rape, Sexual harrassment, unwanted touching

Living with the scars of the past is hard. It takes courage to even tell others about the experiences that haunt us even after years of therapy. Sometimes however as writers we have occasion to come across these same things in our own writing, whether we meant them to appear or not. Continue reading